Denmark

Summary

The BR10 is a performance-based code that requires a mandatory energy frame calculation to establish maximum energy demand for residential and non-residential buildings, 52.5 + 1650/A kWh/m2/pa and 71.3 + 1650/A kWh/m2/pa respectively. The code addresses all thermal envelope requirements and energy-using efficiency standards in the calculation, including, heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water, lighting (only non-residential), heat recovery and conversion and distribution losses.

Denmark first adopted prescriptive building energy efficiency requirements in 1961, and by 1982 the first performance compliance option was included in the code. In 2005 the code was updated to be an overall performance regulation. The latest code and supporting policy encompasses many progressive and dynamic aspects including, mandatory computer modeling, air-tightness testing for all buildings, bioclimatic design considerations, renewable energy included in the calculation, well established boiler and HVAC testing systems, voluntary low energy classes and a national target of 75% less energy to be used in buildings by 2020.

General Information

Full Title of Code

Building Regulation 10 (BR10)

Year of Adoption

2011

Date of Enforcement

Saturday, January 1, 2011

Authority in Charge

Danish Energy Agency (DEA) and of the Danish Enterprise and Construction Authority

Link

http://www.ebst.dk/file/155699/BR10_ENGLISH.pdf

Link to Relevant Web Page

http://www.sustainablebuildingscentre.org/countries/Denmark

Remit of Code

Geographical Coverage

Denmark

Code set at:

National Level

Coverage

Coverage of Building Code:

  • Residential buildings
    • One family
    • Multiple family buildings
  • Commercial buildings
  • Public buildings

GBPN Climate Classification:

  • Heating Based

Type of Building Code

Type of Building Code:

  • Performance Codes for New Builds:
    The energy frame calculates energy performance in all new buildings, using Sbi developed 'BE10' software. Some prescriptive elements form the basis to the energy frame calculation.

Energy Covered

Basis for Energy Requirements:

  • Overall performance frame:
    Maximum energy demand - Supplied Energy .
  • Final Energy:
    Partially - The calculation considers supplied energy.
  • Life Cycle Assessment considered (embedded energy):
    Partially -Voluntary at this stage, modeled on the German DGNB system.

Energy Uses and Functions Covered by the Code:

  • Heating
  • Cooling
  • Ventilation
  • Airtightness
  • Thermal bridging
  • Hot water
  • Building parts (lifts, pumps etc)
  • Technical installations
  • Lighting
  • Design, position & orientation of building
  • Heat recovery
  • Passive solar
  • Passive cooling
  • Natural ventilation
  • Solar protection
  • Daylighting requirements
  • Renewable Energy (solar, PV, others):
    Buildings that are outside of the existing district heating areas where the expected hot water consumption exceeds 2000 liters pr. day, solar power must be installed. Renewable energy required for low energy buildings outside district heating areas.

Enforcement

Enforcement Status of Code:

Mandatory

Type of Enforcement:

  • Local enforcement
  • Third party inspection
  • Central enforcement
  • Accreditation of applicants

On-site Inspections Occur

  • During construction
  • Post completion
  • Post occupancy

Certification to Support Enforcement of Code:

  • Energy Performance Certificate support BC
  • Positive labeling for building beyond the minimum BC level
  • Energy Offsets/Green Certificates
    • Number of certified buildings:
      60231
  • Inspection of boilers
  • Inspection of HVAC systems

Penalties for Non-compliance:

  • Refusal of permission to occupy
  • Refusal of permission to construct

Measures Supporting Enforcement:

  • Commissioning requirements
  • Airtightness testing required prior to compliance
  • Mandatory Computer Modeling
  • Training of Inspectors

Values for New Buildings

Residential

GBPN Climate Classification

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

MeanMinMax
HDD (°C)3238--
CDD (°C)104--
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof0.2Roof2-
Wall0.3Wall2-
Floor0.2Floor2-
Window1.4Window21.5
Others---
Overall U-Value---

Requirements depend on the orientation, amount of windows etc. Covered through the energy frame calculation.

Window1Window2
G Value/SHGC--
Visible Transmission--
Percent--

Other Requirements Set for:

  • Thermal bridge demands
  • Overall Thermal bridge max value:
    0.03 - 0.12 W/(m2·K)
  • Ventilation:
    General sizing and efficiency requirements for most ventilation systems. Included in energy frame calculation.
  • Pressure testing for ducting
  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump:
    DHW systems equipped with a heat pump must have a COP not less than 3.1 for DHW production and Circulation pumps in heating, hot water, and cooling systems must have the energy label A or comply with similar requirements.
  • Value for airtightness:
    1.5 l/sm2 @ 50 Pa.
  • Heat Recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Efficient Lighting

Energy Performance

60.25kwh

Non-Residential

GBPN Climate Classification

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

MeanMinMax
HDD (°C)3238--
CDD (°C)104--
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof0.2Roof2-
Wall0.3Wall2-
Floor0.2Floor2-
Window1.4Window21.5
Others---
Overall U-Value---
Window1Window2
G Value/SHGC--
Visible Transmission--
Percent--

Other Requirements Set for:

  • Thermal bridge demands
  • Overall Thermal bridge max value:
    0.03 - 0.12 W/(m2·K)
  • Ventilation:
    General sizing and efficiency requirements for most ventilation systems. Included in energy frame calculation.
  • Pressure testing for ducting
  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump:
    DHW systems equipped with a heat pump must have a COP not less than 3.1 for DHW production and Circulation pumps in heating, hot water, and cooling systems must have the energy label A or comply with similar requirements.
  • Value for airtightness:
    1.5 l/sm2 @ 50 Pa.
  • Heat Recovery
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Efficient Lighting

Energy Performance

72.12kwh

Code History and Future Targets

General Process in Setting Requirements:

  • How far in advance are future targets set?:
    8 years
  • Stakeholders are informed of future targets far in advance

Zero Energy Targets:

  • Definition of nZEB/ZEB/Plus Energy etc:
    No
  • All end uses are included
  • There is a realistic roadmap in place:
    A roadmap has been set to target being a CO2-emission free country by 2050.
  • National Target date for nZEB:
    Using 75% less energy by 2020 (base year 2008).
  • Special Requirements for public buildings:
    In 2009, it was decided that governmental energy consumption should be reduced by at least 10% by 2011, compared with the consumption in 2006. The certificate of public buildings must be put on physical display in the building itself. Otherwise, public buildings are required to meet normal requirements.
  • Links

Number of Earlier Codes

5

Current Defined Levels beyond Minimum Standard (present code)

1

Number of Future Aspirational Codes

1

Multiple set of data:

  • Levels beyond minimum:
    1-2
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned) :
    2020
  • Baseline (actual code if nothing else):
    2008
  • Actual level of energy consumption in target
    • Relative target in percent:
      50%
  • Levels set in energy frame
  • Primary Energy Performance Frame Residential:
    30 kWh/ m2/pa + 1000A by 2015 and 20 kWh/m2 per year by 2020.
  • Primary Energy Performance Frame Non-Residential :
    41 + 1000/A kWh/m2/pa by 2015 and 25 kWh/m2/pa.

Supporting Measures

Incentives/Rewards to Encourage People to go beyond Minimum Level?

Danish Tax Reform 2010, energy taxes, pollution taxes.

Involvement of Stakeholders in the Development of Codes

All stakeholders are invited to be involved, including a time allowance to comment on any issues etc.

Level of Training Provided to Stakeholders Following Implementation of Code?

Many seminars and courses are available following the implementation of a new code, a small charge usually applies.

Provision of Appropriate Information for General Public

http://www.seeb.dk/ and http://www.klimaogenergiguiden.dk/ and http://www.savingtrust.dk/

Supporting Labeling Schemes

Ecolabelling Denmark is responsible for the administration of the only two officially approved ecolabels in Denmark: The Nordic Ecolabel and the European Ecolabel. Ecolabelling Denmark is independent of producers, brands and financial interests.

Supporting Certification Schemes

Passivhaus Denmark and GBC Denmark works for the development and administration of the certification system for sustainable buildings in Denmark. DGNB, the German certification method, was chosen as the certification method to be used in Denmark.

Codes Free to Access?

http://www.ebst.dk/file/155699/BR10_ENGLISH.pdf

Link to Other Databases

Text

IEA's Sustainable Buildings Centre BEEP Database.

Link

http://www.sustainablebuildingscentre.org/countries/Denmark