Germany

Summary

The EnEV is a performance-based code that requires a mandatory (equivalent model building) energy frame calculation to establish the expected primary energy consumption of residential and non-residential buildings. The regulation addresses thermal envelope requirements and energy using or producing systems in the calculation, including, HVAC, hot water, lighting (non-residential only), bio-climatic design and renewable energy.

Germany has had prescriptive building energy efficiency requirements since 1977. The first performance-based code was introduced following the implementation of the EPBD in 2002. The 2009 version and supporting policies encompasses many progressive aspects including, low maximum u-values established relevant to climate, mandatory computer simulation, air-tightness requirements, well established incentive schemes, frequent boiler and HVAC testing, robust EPC programs, voluntary low energy classes, and a national target for carbon free buildings by 2020.

General Information

Full Title of Code

Energy Conservation Regulations (EnEV)

Year of Adoption

2009

Date of Enforcement

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Authority in Charge

Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Development, Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

Remit of Code

Geographical Coverage

Germany

Code set at:

National Level

Coverage

Coverage of Building Code:

  • Residential buildings
    • One family
    • Multiple family buildings
  • Commercial buildings
    • Offices
    • Hotels
    • Hospitals
  • Public buildings
    • Offices
    • Hospitals

GBPN Climate Classification:

  • Heating Based
  • Climatic zones are not used. Instead residential buildings have a required energy efficiency depending on the geometry of the building.

Type of Building Code

Type of Building Code:

  • Model code, frame or actual code:
    National Code.
  • Performance Codes for New Builds:
    The EnEV is a performance-based code that requires a mandatory (equivalent model building) energy frame calculation to establish the expected primary energy consumption of residential and non-residential buildings.
  • Energy Declaration:
    Energy Performnace Certificate
  • Model / reference Building:
    The energy performance requirement is based on an equivalent model building and measured as kWh/m2/year of primary energy.

Energy Covered

Basis for Energy Requirements:

  • Overall performance frame
  • Primary Energy:
    The energy performance requirement is based on an equivalent model building and measured as kWh/m2/year of primary energy.

Energy Uses and Functions Covered by the Code:

  • Heating
  • Cooling
  • Dehumidification
  • Ventilation
  • Airtightness
  • Thermal bridging
  • Hot water
  • Technical installations
  • Lighting
  • Design, position & orientation of building
  • Passive cooling
  • Renewable Energy (solar, PV, others):
    Requirement of heat supply based on renewable energy 15 ~ 50% depending on the type of renewable energy and building.

Enforcement

Enforcement Status of Code:

Mandatory

Type of Enforcement:

  • Accreditation of applicants

On-site Inspections Occur

  • During construction
  • Post completion

Certification to Support Enforcement of Code:

  • Energy Performance Certificate support BC
  • Positive labeling for building beyond the minimum BC level
  • Inspection of boilers
  • Inspection of HVAC systems

Penalties for Non-compliance:

  • Refusal of permission to occupy
  • Refusal of permission to construct

Measures Supporting Enforcement:

  • Mandatory Computer Modeling
  • Training of Inspectors

Values for New Buildings

Residential and Non-Residential buildings.

GBPN Climate Classification

Heating based

Coefficient for Comparison of Climate Zones

0.00

MeanMinMax
HDD (°C)3093--
CDD (°C)245--
U-Value (W/m²K)
Roof0.2Roof2-
Wall0.28Wall2-
Floor0.28Floor2-
Window1.3Window21.8
Others1.4--
Overall U-Value---
Window1Window2
G Value/SHGC0.50.5
Visible Transmission--
Percent--

Other Requirements Set for:

  • Thermal bridge demands
  • Ventilation:
    Depends on the type and size of the system.
  • Domestic Hot Water COP - Heat Pump:
    Depends on the type and size of the system.
  • Value for airtightness:
    For naturally ventilated buildings, n50 is 3.0h-1 and for mechanically ventilated buildings, n50 is 1.5h-1.
  • Technical HVAC systems
  • Efficient Lighting

Energy Performance

0.00kwh

Code History and Future Targets

General Process in Setting Requirements:

  • How far in advance are future targets set?:
    2018, 2020
  • Stakeholders are informed of future targets far in advance

Zero Energy Targets:

  • All end uses are included
  • There is not a realistic roadmap in place:
    Not known at this stage.
  • National Target date for nZEB:
    By 2020 buildings should be operating without fossil fuel. The German government has committed to reducing the primary energy demand of buildings by 80% by 2050. Achieving this reduction will require foremost efficiency improvements, with a first milestone of a 20% reduction in heat demand levels by 2020.

Number of Earlier Codes

3

Multiple set of data:

  • Levels beyond minimum:
    Residential Low Energy Building requirements = kfW60 (60kWh/(m2•a) or KfW40 (40 kWh/(m2•a)) maximum energy consumption or Passive House = KfW-40 buildings with an annual heat demand lower than 15 kWh/m2 and total consumption lower than 120 kWh/m2
  • Year historic or aspirational codes (planned) :
    2014
  • Baseline (actual code if nothing else):
    2009
  • Actual level of energy consumption in target
    • Relative target in percent:
      30
  • Levels set in primary energy
  • Primary Energy Performance Frame Residential:
    In 2020 new buildings shall be “climate friendly” with less primary energy demand.
  • Primary Energy Performance Frame Non-Residential :
    In 2020 new buildings shall be “climate friendly” with less primary energy demand.

Supporting Measures

Incentives/Rewards to Encourage People to go beyond Minimum Level?

The government-owned banking group Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW) plays a central role concerning promotion of energy savings and CO2 reduction in the building sector. Between 1990 and the end of 2009 subsidies for at least 3.1 million homes were implemented. In 2009, total subsidies amounted to 16.9 billion, of which 10.6 billion was for energy effciency and 6.3 billion for renewable energies.

Involvement of Stakeholders in the Development of Codes

Yes

Level of Training Provided to Stakeholders Following Implementation of Code?

Yes

Provision of Appropriate Information for General Public

Yes

Education Systems to Ensure Capacity

Yes

Supporting Labeling Schemes

Yes

Supporting Certification Schemes

Yes

Codes Free to Access?

Yes

Text on Code Access

http://www.enev-online.de/

Link to Other Databases

Text

IEA's Sustainable Buildings Centre BEEP Database.

Link

http://www.sustainablebuildingscentre.org/countries/Germany