Buildings For Our Future, The Deep Path for Closing the Emissions Gap in the Building Sector

Policy Paper / Report / 25-06-2013 / Global / English
Authors: GBPN

Why buildings hold the key to a low-carbon future? The GBPN provides evidence that ambitious improvements in the energy performance of buildings can reduce their CO2 emissions by one third by 2050 and sets out the necessary steps towards a "Deep market transformation". 

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Glossary

The Deep Scenario or Deep Energy Scenario is defined as a scenario, in which state of the art in both new and existing buildings will become the norm in only ten years from now. [Source: Urge-Vorsatz, D. (CEU) (2012) Best Practice Policies for Low Carbon and Energy Buildings-Based on Scenario Analysis]

The calculated or measured amount of energy needed to meet the energy demand associated with a typical use of the buildings, which includes inter alia, energy used for heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water and lighting (EU). [Source: EPBD recast, 2010/31/EU]

In the context of climate change mitigation, the mitigation potential is the amount of mitigation that could be (but is not yet) released over time. [Source: IPCC]

The moderate efficiency scenario illustrates the development of building energy use under recent policy trends. It is still an ambitious scenario as it also assumes an increase in retrofit dynamics (typically from 1.4% to 2.1% in the EU-27, China - 1.6% and India - 1.5%) as well as widespread building codes. However, these accelerated retrofit buildings and new constructions still resilt in far lower efficiency levels than what is achievable with state-of-the-art solutions: new buildings are built to approximately regional code standards in existence at the time of this study; renovations are carried out to achieve approximately 30% energy savings from the existing stock average. Water heating efficiency measures are not more ambitious than currently existing programs such as the boiler scrappage scheme in the UK and the 'efficient stove initiative' in India. [Source: Urge-Vorsatz, D. (CEU) (2012) Best Practice Policies for Low Carbon and Energy Buildings-Based on Scenario Analysis]

A collection of policies and programmes that support the implementation of a common goal.