Mitigation Potential from India’s Buildings

Report bundle / Policies /
Authors: GBPN

The enormity of the country and pace of the current construction boom mean that India could experience a 700% increase in COemissions and energy consumption in buildings by 2050. With savings potential five times current energy use in buildings, GBPN reviews scenarios for mitigation and surveys current policy and potential for implementation.

 

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Glossary

In the context of climate change mitigation, the abatement potential is the amount of mitigation that could be reduced over time. [Source: IPCC]

The calculated or measured amount of energy needed to meet the energy demand associated with a typical use of the buildings, which includes inter alia, energy used for heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water and lighting (EU). [Source: EPBD recast, 2010/31/EU]

Greenhouse gases are those gaseous constituents of the atmosphere, both natural and anthropogenic, which absorb and emit radiation at specific wavelengths within the spectrum of thermal infrared radiation emitted by the Earth’s surface, by the atmosphere itself, and by clouds. This property causes the greenhouse effect. Water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4), and ozone (O3) are the primary greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. Moreover, there are a number of entirely human-made greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, such as the halocarbons and other chlorine- and bromine-containing substances, dealt with under the Montreal Protocol. Besides CO2, N2O, and CH4, the Kyoto Protocol deals with the greenhouse gases sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and perfluorocarbons(PFCs).

A collection of policies and programmes that support the implementation of a common goal.