Residential Buildings in India: Energy Use Projections and Savings Potentials

Technical Report / Report / 23-09-2014 / India / English
Authors: GBPN & CEPT

A new scenario analysis demonstrates that a very aggressive residential building energy efficiency policy and market driven scenario in India can substantially reduce future energy demand in the sector. Following a business-as-usual scenario it is estimated that consumption from the residential building sector could rise up to 8 times. The study shows that it is possible to avoid this worst-case scenario by developing energy-efficiency strategies focused on the residential sector and provides recommendations to help decision-makers move towards a sustainable future.

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Glossary

Buildling energy use scenarios present the potential trends of building energy use under different decision regimes. [Source: Urge-Vorsatz, D. (CEU) (2012) Best Practice Policies for Low Carbon and Energy Buildings-Based on Scenario Analysis]

The Deep Scenario or Deep Energy Scenario is defined as a scenario, in which state of the art in both new and existing buildings will become the norm in only ten years from now. [Source: Urge-Vorsatz, D. (CEU) (2012) Best Practice Policies for Low Carbon and Energy Buildings-Based on Scenario Analysis]

An amount of saved energy determined by measuring and or estimating consumption before and after implementation of one or more energy efficiency improvement measure, whilst ensuring normalisation for external conditions that affect energy consumption. [Source: Energy Efficiency Directive 2012/27/EU]

A building should be regarded as a residential building when more than hald of the floor area is used for dwelling purposes. Other buildings should be regarded as non-residential. Two types of residential buildings can be distinguished: 1.) Houses (ground-oriented residential buildings): comprising all types of houses (detached, semi-detached, terraced houses, houses built in a row, etc.) each dwelling of which has its own entrance directly from the ground surface; 2.) other residential buildings: comprising all residential buildings other than ground-oriented residential buildings as defined above. [Source: OECD Glossary of Statistical Terms]