What is a Deep Renovation Definition?

Technical Report / Report / 01-03-2013 / Global / English
Authors: GBPN

What is a “deep” renovation? The GBPN convened collaborators on both sides of the Atlantic and around the world in order to formulate coherent definitions. Together we reached a general understanding on the most commonly used expressions: deep renovation and deep retrofit. 

Downloads

PDF icon 08.DR_TechRep.low_.pdf

Related News

Related Laboratory Projects

Report Bundle

What is a Deep Renovation Definition?

Other Formats of this Report

Knowledge Pyramid
10 Steps To Twitter - Step: 110 Steps To Twitter - Step: 210 Steps To Twitter - Step: 310 Steps To Twitter - Step: 410 Steps To Twitter - Step: 510 Steps To Twitter - Step: 610 Steps To Twitter - Step: 710 Steps To Twitter - Step: 810 Steps To Twitter - Step: 910 Steps To Twitter - Step: 10

Glossary

Deep Reduction or Deep Energy Reduction is a term used in US for a deep renovation or a deep refurbishment, which aims at 75 % or more reduction in energy use compared to before the improvement. E.g. the 1000 homes challenge. [Source: GBPN, 2012]

Deep Refurbishment or Deep Energy Refurbishment means to bring something back from a state of reduced efficiency to a better state with ‘deep’ indicating a very substantial improvement of the energy use. [Source: GBPN, 2012]

Deep Renovation or Deep Energy Renovation is a term for a building renovation that captures the full economic energy efficiency potential of improvements. This typically includes a focus on the building shell of existing buildings in order to achieve very high-energy performance. The renovated building consumes 75% less primary energy compared to the status of the existing building before the renovation. The energy consumption after renovation for heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water and lighting, is less than 60 kWh/m2/yr. (Definition often used in Europe) [Source: GBPN, 2012]

Deep retrofit or Deep Energy Retrofit implies replacing existing systems in a building with similar ones that are of higher quality and performance, which leads to a better energy performance of an existing building. The primary energy consumption includes energy used for heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water, lighting, installed equipment and appliances. After the deep retrofit the buildings consume 50% less primary energy compared to the status of theexisting building/s the retrofit (Definition mainly used in US). [Source: GBPN, 2012]