How to Scale up the Best Deep Renovation Projects Across the World?

Rosa Sitja's picture
09-04-2013 | Rosa Sitjà | Global, 全球, South-East Asia, South-East Asia
Categories: Deep Renovation

At GBPN I’m participating in a collaborative project about existing buildings. The aim of the project is to investigate how we can scale up the best deep renovation projects across the world and show that buildings owners are doing and should be doing MORE AND DEEPER RENOVATIONS.

The topic is of huge technological and economical interest, if you consider that buildings accounts for 40% of the total CO2 emissions. Cutting off 75% (a deep renovation for GBPN) of the existing buildings energy consumption would save energy consumers a big amount of their bills and would help to meet the CO2 and energy targets and therefore, save our planet from climate change. 
 
The problem seems to be that we have many buildings in the world and they are all built differently, so there is not a unique renovation kit that can be used for all the buildings in the world. This means that there is a huge technological challenge for the construction companies to deeply renovate a building at a reduced cost. Moreover, the investment required to reach 75% energy consumption reduction might in some cases be so high that it would take many years to recover it based on energy bill savings alone. Therefore, more innovative investment business models need to be investigated and developed. 
 
Despite all this, the building owners have acknowledged that the energy efficiency label of their building will increasingly influence the building value, meaning that an energy deep renovation pays off not just in lower energy bills, but also in higher building value. Our research so far confirms that there is a need to document the existing deep renovation projects better and to take a look at possibilities to reduce costs. These good practices should be replicated across the world to boost the market growth and should convince investors to believe in this market and therefore, convince them that financing this type of projects are a good business for them and for the environment. 
 
In the project “More and Deeper Renovation” we want to involve leading experts on deep renovation of the world to feed into our research. With this aim we organized two webinars last year around the topic: What is deep renovation? What are the criteria to select best practices? Which are the most relevant deep renovation projects or existing policies on renovation that can be used to replicate and upscale best practices across the world? What is the cost of a Deep Renovation? The research around Definitions is presented in the DR Definitions Paper
 
We continue this work as part of the 2013 work programme. I invite everybody interested in the topic to work with us and to express their thoughts on the Laboratory “More and Deeper Renovation”. Working alone is a start, but if we work together we will get stronger. We are looking forward to collaborating with you! 

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Glossary

Deep Reduction or Deep Energy Reduction is a term used in US for a deep renovation or a deep refurbishment, which aims at 75 % or more reduction in energy use compared to before the improvement. E.g. the 1000 homes challenge. [Source: GBPN, 2012]

Deep Refurbishment or Deep Energy Refurbishment means to bring something back from a state of reduced efficiency to a better state with ‘deep’ indicating a very substantial improvement of the energy use. [Source: GBPN, 2012]

Deep Renovation or Deep Energy Renovation is a term for a building renovation that captures the full economic energy efficiency potential of improvements. This typically includes a focus on the building shell of existing buildings in order to achieve very high-energy performance. The renovated building consumes 75% less primary energy compared to the status of the existing building before the renovation. The energy consumption after renovation for heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water and lighting, is less than 60 kWh/m2/yr. (Definition often used in Europe) [Source: GBPN, 2012]

Efficiency is the extent to which the program has converted or is expected to convert its resources/inputs (such as funds, expertise, time, etc.) economically into results in order to achieve the maximum possible outputs, outcomes, and impacts with the minimum possible inputs. [Source: World Bank]

The calculated or measured amount of energy needed to meet the energy demand associated with a typical use of the buildings, which includes inter alia, energy used for heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water and lighting (EU). [Source: EPBD recast, 2010/31/EU]